News and Events

Early Career Research event – Scholarship with Survivors Workshop – Call for participants – Deadline 17 September 2018

Antislavery Early Research Association

The Antislavery Early Research Association is running the following event:

Scholarship with Survivors Workshop – A Day of Conversation between Early Career Researchers and Survivors

University of Nottingham, UK

Saturday 20 October 2018

The Scholarship with Survivors Workshop aims to provide a platform for open dialogue between early career researchers and survivors of contemporary forms of slavery. Throughout the day, we will consider what diverse areas of research have to offer to survivors, how survivors’ perspectives can (and should) influence research, and the ways in which scholars and survivors can work together to produce and develop knowledge. By creating an informal environment in which knowledge is exchanged freely and equally, we seek to create an approach that abolishes the barrier between institution academia and survivor communities. The workshop will feature a presentation, panel session and Q&A with survivors, as well as thematic, round table discussions of selected focus areas, providing an opportunity for researchers to engage with survivors and one another.

A call for participants in any field or discipline researching issues relating to slavery, antislavery, and human trafficking – both modern and historic has been issued. For further information please see the full call document – Scholarship with Survivors Workshop Call for Participants

The organisers are also reaching out to survivors of slavery and human trafficking to join us in Nottingham, to participate in the workshop and become part of a growing network of early career researchers working in the area. You are welcome to attend as a general participant or as a presenter on the survivor panel. As a participant, you will not be required to tell everyone that you are a survivor of slavery. If you are interested please see here for further information – Call for Survivor Participants – 2018

 

Welcome to Shamere McKenzie, CEO Sun Gate Foundation

The Antislavery Usable Past is delighted to welcome Shamere McKenzie, CEO Sun Gate Foundation, as an Advisory Board Member to the project.

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Shamere is herself a survivor of modern slavery and now uses her past adversity to raise awareness of human trafficking by speaking at various universities, conferences, community events and with government officials around the world. She partners with organisations by empowering survivors and youth within their programs, trains various professionals on how to identify and respond to human trafficking and have written and emergency shelter program for adult survivors of human trafficking. Her story has been featured in several books including a college text book focused on social justice. In addition, her story has been featured on various television and radio programs, in magazines and newspapers, on several blogs and she has received numerous awards for her work.

The Sun Gate Foundation is an anti-trafficking organisation that provides educational opportunities for survivors of human trafficking. It is Shamere’s desire that the Sun Gate Foundation will empower survivors to pick up their broken pieces and go confidently after their dreams.

Review of Historians Against Slavery Conference

‘U.S. Studies Online’ have published a positive review of the Historians Against Slavery Conference that was organised by Antislavery Usable Past in October 2017. The post by delegate Charlotte James, a postgraduate student, was published on 22 December 2017. U.S. Studies Online is the Postgraduate and Early Career Researcher webspace of the British Association for American Studies (BAAS).

For the full article go to http://www.baas.ac.uk/usso/historians-against-slavery/

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Mural collection launched on the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery (2 December)

Using street art to help fight modern slavery

The University of Nottingham is launching the first ever major collection of murals focussing on slavery and the anti-slavery movement on the International Day for the Abolition of Slavery (2 December).

Murals are a common tool in the fight against slavery, but their ephemeral nature means that that have a limited lifespan. The Antislavery Usable Past project has created the first large-scale collection of antislavery murals. It brings together both interior and exterior murals from the 1920s through to present day.

By evaluating how different groups have used murals about the antislavery past for protest and community activism, the archive aims to encourage contemporary antislavery activists to use this form of community artwork to raise awareness and build city-wide “slavery-free community” campaigns.

Created by researcher Hannah Jeffery, the archive currently features murals of historical American abolitionist leaders such as Frederick Douglas, Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, Denmark Vesey and Nathaniel Turner. It also includes murals that use the visual iconography of slavery and antislavery. Going forward it will expand to include murals about historical antislavery from the UK and around the world, and also begin to feature new murals that focus on the contemporary movement against slavery and human trafficking.

“In creating this archive, I wanted to establish a sense of permanence for these murals to ensure they remain visible in the historical protest narrative, even if erased from their physical location. Two of the main purposes of the archive are to show how these artworks have long been protest tools to tell forgotten antislavery stories for the purpose of galvanizing community activism, and also to highlight lessons we can learn and apply to murals today that raise awareness of contemporary slavery and human trafficking.” Hannah Jeffery, PhD student, Antislavery Usable Past

To find out more about the archive visit antislavery.ac.uk/murals

Launch event for Remembering 1807 digital archive

pjimage (9)Please join us to launch Remembering 1807, a new digital archive of commemorative activity relating to the transatlantic slave trade and its abolition. This free event will take place at the Museum of London Docklands on 20 September, 6.30 – 8 pm.

Please register for the launch to hear more about this new resource, a collection of the Antislavery Usable Past Archive.

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Stay Safe from Slavery Conference

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Unchosen are delighted to announce an innovative conference called Stay Safe from Slavery, focusing on new ways of preventing Modern Slavery in the UK. The conference takes place at the University of Nottingham on 21 June 2017. The university’s Research Priority Area in Rights and Justice and Antislavery Usable Past project is partnering on the conference, in conjunction with work to make Nottingham a slavery-free city.

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Empires of Charity Workshop

Mary Wills will be presenting at the University of Warwick’s Poverty Research Network workshop on 3 March 2017. The Poverty Research Network brings together scholars from different disciplines, working on broad themes of poverty and social justice from the local to the global level. The ‘Empires of Charity‘ workshop looks to explore the relationship between systems of charity and imperialism broadly defined within a global framework. Mary will be speaking on the British anti-slavery cause in nineteenth-century West Africa, and how abolitionism became intertwined with concepts of imperialism, philanthropy and humanitarianism.

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