Archives into the Future workshop, 29 February 2016

Archives_into_the_Future

Archives care for the past, but what is their role in caring for the future?

The Antislavery Usable Past project, in collaboration with Performing the Jewish Archive, organises the Archives into the Future seminar series. The annual workshops provide a forum for creative debate about the issues facing archives today, and for exploring innovative approaches towards archives in the future.

The next workshop in the series, on 29 February 2016, will focus on ‘Archives and the Third Sector’. It will take place at the British Library, our conference partners for this event.

A core aim of Antislavery Usable Past is to demonstrate that applied knowledge of the history of antislavery movements offers a way to ‘care for the future’, by providing a usable past for today’s campaigners.

In the same way that history can empower individuals and groups, archives are dynamic tools for social and cultural change. This workshop will offer a forum for an exchange of ideas between archivists, curators, academics, NGOs, charities and human rights organisations. The day will consist of short talks and discussion sessions.

Speakers will explore the significance of historical grounding for modern-day humanitarianism, and how heritage resources can be utilised to drive social change. Discussions will focus on themes such as the relationships between archives, research and social activism; how archives can inform contemporary policy debates and impact on current struggles for social justice; and the value of archives in Third Sector campaigning.

The Programme is now available.

Register

The event is free, including refreshments and lunch. Spaces are limited, however, so early registration is encouraged.

Doctoral students and Early Career Researchers are particularly welcome to attend.


Images courtesy of ‘Images of Human Trafficking and www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite (sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library

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